Different Magic Tricks You Can Master

With all the amazing illusions that magicians deliver to our eyes, it’s obvious why most people share a fascination for the art of magic. Both old and young minds alike can be fooled by a trick, but it is especially when we are young and impressionable that this art truly captivates us. So powerful is the charm that many even attempt to become masters of this profession. But what are the best ways to start with magic?

Card tricks are the most common form of magicCard Magic

Due to its wide availability, a deck of cards is often sought by magicians as a tool to perform illusions. The range of difficulty for handling a deck can vary so considerably that both amateurs and professionals can successfully benefit from this item. After obtaining a couple of decks, a quick search online will then reveal countless websites offering free written and video tutorials on how to perform card tricks. Some of the most amazing deceptions are self-working and require almost no handling at all. With only a few minutes of practice, most amateur conjurers will be ready to demonstrate some incredible card tricks.

If ordinary playing cards do not motivate enough, another option for beginners is a gaffed deck. This item looks exactly the same as a conventional deck, but in reality it has been altered for a specific magical purpose. Gaffed decks are ideal because these normally require very basic manipulation skills, spectators are unable to detect the modifications, and deliver seemingly impossible illusions.

Magic Gimmicks

Gimmicks are objects used by magicians to help them accomplish a desired effect. A gimmick tends to remain hidden from the spectator and if used correctly, it can reduce the difficulty of a trick significantly. Imagine an illusion in which a coin vanishes from an observer’s hand. To accomplish this with no gimmicks, one must think of a very unique set of movements and actions that will fool such person. However, if we had an object that could secretly steal the coin, it would require much less effort to perform this illusion. A device named ‘The Raven’ does exactly as described above and can usually be found, along with many other useful gimmicks, in any average magic shop.

Meet Other Magicians

Often when starting in magic, it is easy to feel lost and frustrated with no clear path to follow. Online forums are great platforms for enthusiasts and professionals to discuss the art of magic. Most forums are free to join and typically contain beginner’s sections with many magicians eager to help. A vast amount of different members makes it easy to find posts regarding almost all imaginable issues that a novice might have.

Another great method to connect with magicians is by joining local magic groups or circles. Unlike online forums, these groups provide opportunities to connect with individuals and learn from their experiences at much deeper levels. Seeing an effect performed from only a small distance away is much more beneficial than reading a description.

Becoming a Magician

Though the feats performed by magicians seem impossible and complicated, any ordinary person can easily start learning magic. Cards, gimmicks, and forums are just a few simple methods through which beginners can venture into the world of illusions. If one is interested enough, then performing magic can certainly become a career. However, for this to be true, we must all start somewhere.

New York’s Bindlestiff Family Cirkus Soars to New Heights

For the New York-based performing group Bindlestiff Family Cirkus, tradition is something meant to be challenged, even as it’s being celebrated.

Bindlestiff Family CirkusAnd while the circus remains a real family tradition, Bindlestiff is turning the genre on its ear, merging acrobatics, burlesque, and vaudevillian humor into one action-packed, surprising show.

A Cirkus is Born

Founded in 1996 by Stephanie Monseu and Keith Nelson, the talented troupe of two to 16 performers per show regularly performs at theaters, colleges, and festivals, sharing its love of the variety arts with audiences worldwide.

With its founders well-versed in the art of fire eating, Bindlestiff offers audiences a chance to view the nearly impossible, providing a spectacle that for adult audiences stretches the definition of what is traditionally considered a circus, crafting a somewhat raunchy and utterly riveting production that merges sideshow, burlesque, music, and vaudeville.

A Little Bit of Magic

For several years, the troupe performed in what it billed as “the last vaudeville house in Times Square,” presenting several shows a day and giving both audiences and performers a chance to explore vaudeville-style arts better.

They were forced to close up shop when the former shoe store was demolished in 2004, but the group soon hit the road, bringing its finely-honed, edgy acts including sword swallowing, fire eating, acrobatics, contortion, magic, and buffoonery to audiences worldwide.

Kinko the ClownFrom Kinko the Clown, who made a satirical bid for president in 2008, to Mr. Pennygaff’s sword swallowing, Miss Una’s surprising aerial feats and Philomena’s precision bull whip handling, a skill that allows her to slice a rose held between a volunteer’s trembling teeth. The show is a risque celebration of the circus, one that pushes boundaries while still allowing viewers to be swept away for a while by the death-defying feats.

Educational Opportunities

Bindlestiff is also dedicated to teaching performers the art of the circus, and the non-profit organization offers workshops, performances, and lectures for the general public along with advanced classes and internships within the group.

The troupe also performs and presents workshops in schools, ranging from single workshops to two-week programs that explore the circus, vaudeville, Wild West touring shows and sideshows, ultimately offering a study of more than a century of American entertainment.

The courses allow everyone who has ever dreamed about running away to join the circus a chance to realize that dream for a while, generating increased interest in the spectacle that ultimately is the circus at the same time.

Beyond Bindlestiff

More than 400 Bindlestiff graduates are currently performing at a variety of venues worldwide.